Stories from Suffragette City

Stories from Suffragette CityA collection of short stories from a chorus of bestselling writers all set on the same day, October 23, 1915, in which over a million women marched for the right to vote in New York City with an introduction by Kristin Hannah.

Stories From Suffragette City is a collection of short stories from the leading voices in historical fiction that all take place on a single day. The day one million women marched for the right to vote in New York City in 1915. A day filled with a million different stories, and a million different voices longing to be heard. Taken together, these stories from writers at the top of their bestselling game become a chorus, stitching together a portrait of a country looking for a fight, and echo into a resounding force strong enough to break even the most stubborn of glass ceilings.
With stories from:
Lisa Wingate
M. J. Rose
Steve Berry
Paula McLain
Katherine J. Chen
Christina Baker Kline
Jamie Ford
Dolen Perkins Valdez
Megan Chance
Alyson Richman
Chris Bohjalian
and Fiona Davis

Who Was Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

Who Was Ruth Bader Ginsburg?
You've probably seen her on T shirts, mugs, and even tattoos. Now that famous face graces the cover of this Who Was? book.


Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was famous for her stylish collars (called jabots) and her commanding dissents. This opera loving New Yorker always spoke her mind; as a young lawyer, RBG advocated for gender equality and women's rights when few others did. She gained attention for the cases she won when arguing in front of the Supreme Court, before taking her place on the bench in 1993. Author Patricia Brennan Demuth answers all the questions about what made RBG so irreplaceable and how the late Supreme Court justice left a legacy that will last forever.

Fight of the Century: Alice Paul Battles Woodrow Wilson for the Vote

Fight of the Century: Alice Paul Battles Woodrow Wilson for the VoteThe fight for women's suffrage between women's rights leader Alice Paul and President Woodrow Wilson is presented as a four round boxing match in this nonfiction picture book.

When Woodrow Wilson was elected President, he didn't know that he would be participating in one of the greatest fights of the century: the battle for women's right to vote. The formidable Alice Paul led the women's suffrage movement, and saw President Wilson's election as an opportunity to win the vote to women. She battered her opponent with endless strategic arguments and carefully coordinated protests, calling for a new amendment granting women the right to vote. With a spirit and determination that never quit even when peaceful protests were met with violence and even when many women were thrown in jail Paul eventually convinced President Wilson to support her cause, changing the country forever.

The Pink Hat

The Pink HatCelebrate the 2017 Women's March with this charming and empowering picture book about a pink hat and the budding feminist who finds it.

Here is a clever story that follows the journey of a pink hat that is swiped out of a knitting basket by a pesky kitten, blown into a tree by a strong wind, and used as a cozy blanket for a new baby, then finally makes its way onto the head of a young girl marching for women's equality.

Inspired by the 5 million people (many of them children) in 82 countries who participated in the 2017 Women's March, Andrew Joyner has given us a book that celebrates girls and women and equal rights for all!

With themes of empathy, equality, and solidarity, The Pink Hat is a timeless and timely story that will empower readers and promote strength in the diverse and active feminist community.

Shoot Like a Girl: One Woman's Dramatic Fight in Afghanistan and on the Home Front

Shoot Like a Girl: One Woman's Dramatic Fight in Afghanistan and on the Home FrontOn June 29, 2009, Air National Guard Major Mary Jennings “MJ” Hegar was shot down while on a Medevac mission on her third tour in Afghanistan. Despite being wounded, she fought the enemy and saved the lives of her crew and their patients. But soon she would face a new battle: to give women who serve on the front lines the credit they deserve   After being commissioned into the U.S. Air Force, Hegar was selected for pilot training by the Air National Guard, finished at the top of her class, then served three tours in Afghanistan flying combat search and rescue missions, culminating in a harrowing rescue attempt that would earn her the Purple Heart as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor.   But it was on American soil that Hegar would embark on her greatest challenge— to eliminate the military’s Ground Combat Exclusion Policy, which kept female armed service members from officially serving in combat roles despite their long standing record of doing so with honor.   In Shoot like A Girl, Hegar takes the reader on a dramatic journey through her military career: an inspiring, humorous, and thrilling true story of a brave, high spirited, and unforgettable woman who has already spent much of her life ready to sacrifice everything for her country, her fellow man, and her sense of justice.                           

Feminisms: A Global History

Feminisms: A Global HistoryHow has feminism developed? What have feminists achieved? What can we learn from the global history of feminism?Feminism is the ongoing story of a profound historical transformation. Despite being repeatedly written off as a political movement that has achieved its aim of female liberation, it has been continually redefined as new generations of women campaign against the gender inequity of their age.In this absorbing book, historian Lucy Delap challenges the simplistic narrative of 'feminist waves' a sequence of ever progressive updates ­ showing instead that feminists have been motivated by the specific concerns of their historical moment. Drawing on an extraordinary range of examples from Japan to Russia, Egypt to Germany, Delap explores different feminist projects to show that those who are part of this movement have not always agreed on a single programme. This diverse history of feminism, she argues, can help us better navigate current debates and controversies.A tour de force from an award winning expert, Feminisms shows that a rich relationship to the past can infuse today's activism with a sense possibility and inspiration.

Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a Time

Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a TimeA full color book inspired by the documentary film Girl Rising about educating girls across the globe.

Worldwide, over 62 million girls are not in school.
But one girl with courage is a revolution.

Girl Rising, a global campaign for girls’ education, created a film that chronicled the stories of nine girls in the developing world, allowing viewers the opportunity to witness how education can break the cycle of poverty.

Now, award winning author Tanya Lee Stone uses new research to illuminate the dramatic facts behind the film, focusing both on the girls captured on camera and many others. She examines barriers to education in depth—early child marriage and childbearing, slavery, sexual trafficking, gender discrimination, and poverty—and shows how removing these barriers means not only a better life for girls, but safer, healthier, and prosperous communities.

Girls with Guts!: The Road to Breaking Barriers and Bashing Records

Girls with Guts!: The Road to Breaking Barriers and Bashing RecordsNo chasing! No stretching or straining! And never, ever sweat. These were the rules girls were forced to play by until Title IX passed in 1972. And it was a game changer.

A celebration of the strength, endurance, and athleticism of women and girls throughout the ages,Girls With Guts! keeps score with examples of women athletes from the late 1800s up through the 1970s, sharing how women refused to take no for an answer, and how finally, they pushed for a law to protect their right to play, compete, and be athletes.

Ten Women Who Changed Science, and the World

Ten Women Who Changed Science, and the World
'These minibiographies of women who persisted will move anyone with an avid curiosity about the world.' Publishers Weekly

With a foreword by Athene Donald, Professor of Experimental Physics, University of Cambridge and Master of Churchill College.
Ten Women Who Changed Science tells the moving stories of the physicists, biologists, chemists, astronomers and doctors who helped to shape our world with their extraordinary breakthroughs and inventions, and outlines their remarkable achievements.These scientists overcame significant obstacles, often simply because they were women. Their science and their lives were driven by personal tragedies and shaped by seismic world events. What drove these remarkable women to cure previously incurable diseases, disprove existing theories or discover new sources of energy? Some were rewarded with the Nobel Prize for their pioneering achievements Madame Curie, twice others were not and, even if they had been, many are still not the household names they should be.Despite living during periods when the contribution of women was disregarded, if not ignored, these resilient women persevered with their research, whether creating life saving drugs or expanding our knowledge of the cosmos. By daring to ask 'How?' and 'Why?' and persevering against all odds, each of these women, in a variety of ways, has helped to make the world a better place.The scientists are: Henrietta Leavitt (United States, Astronomy); Lise Meitner (Austria, Physics); Chien Shiung Wu (United States, Physics); Marie Curie (France, Chemistry); Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (United Kingdom, Chemistry); Virginia Apgar (United States, Medicine); Gertrude Elion (United States, Medicine); Rita Levi Montalicini (Italy, Biology); Elsie Widdowson (United Kingdom, Biology); Rachel Carson (United States, Biology).

Two Friends

Two FriendsSome people had rights, while others had none.Why shouldn't they have them, too?Two friends, Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass, get together for tea and conversation. They recount their similar stories fighting to win rights for women and African Americans. The premise of this particular exchange between the two is based on a statue in their hometown of Rochester, New York, which shows the two friends having tea.

Born to Ride: A Story About Bicycle Face

Born to Ride: A Story About Bicycle FaceLouise Belinda Bellflower lives in Rochester, New York, in 1896. She spends her days playing with her brother, Joe. But Joe gets to ride a bicycle, and Louise Belinda doesn't. In fact, Joe issues a solemn warning: If girls ride bikes, their faces will get so scrunched up, eyes bulging from the effort of balancing, that they'll get stuck that way FOREVER! Louise Belinda is appalled by this nonsense, so she strikes out to discover the truth about this so called bicycle face. Set against the backdrop of the women's suffrage movement, Born to Ride is the story of one girl's courageous quest to prove that she can do everything the boys can do, while capturing the universal freedom and accomplishment children experience when riding a bike.